Mar 9, 2017

Hamantaschen 2017






 Ready to bake your hamantaschen; poppy and prune lekvar? Nope! Those are soooo yesterday! Nowadays hamantaschen have taken on a life of their own and show up in food publications in all sorts of flavors from cookies & cream to bagel & lox. You can actually plan a Purim menu with hamantaschen for every course. Imagine if your meal went like this:

Hamantasch-shaped Challah

Appetizer—Taco Hamantaschen with Guacamole

Soup—Roasted Vegetable Soup with Hamantaschen Croutons

Entrée—Open-Face Beef Wellington Hamantaschen with sautéed mushroom hamantaschen in puff pastry, Hamantasch Potato Knishes and Mini Broccoli Quiche Hamantaschen

Dessert—Cookies an Cream Chocolate Hamantaschen with Marshmallow Filling or Cherry Pie Hamantaschen in a Cookie Dough Crust

A bit much wouldn’t you say?

So, while you don’t have to go overboard, you can incorporate some Hamantasch variety into your meal. Just don’t go overboard!




This makes the perfect finger-food for guests who drop by to bring you mishloach manos.

Dough:


1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup canola oil



Filling:

1/2 pound ground chicken or veal
1 1/2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses

1 cup parsley, checked and roughly chopped or one tablespoon dry
2 tablespoons pine nuts
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/4 small red onion, minced fine
1 egg, beaten with a splash of water to form an egg wash



Make the dough: Mix all of the ingredients together in a large bowl, kneading until it forms a smooth, soft dough. Cover and let relax for at least half an hour.

Make the filling: Mix all of the ingredients together in a small bowl, until the seasonings have been worked into the ground meat.



Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F, and lightly dust your countertop with flour. Line two rimmed sheet pans with parchment paper or silicone mats

Roll out the dough until it's very thin, less than ¼ inch. Cut out 3-inch circles, and place a tablespoon of filling in each circle. Gather the scraps of dough; knead back together, and cover and let sit.

Brush the edges of the filled circles with the egg wash, and then fold the edges over to create a hamantaschen shape, leaving just a bit of filling peeping through the center. Press the corners to seal. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling.

Transfer the shaped hamantaschen to the lined pan. Brush the dough with the remaining egg wash, and bake until the filling is cooked and the dough is lightly browned, about 15-20 minutes. Serve warm.




Olives and tomato sauce make this hamantasch tangy and tart



Dough:

1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 cups flour

1 teaspoon dried basil

1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup water
1/3 cup good quality olive oil



Filling:

8 ounces ground beef
1/2 small yellow onion, diced
1 garlic clove, crushed
1/4 cup diced pimiento-stuffed green olives
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 cup tomato sauce
1 tablespoon honey
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper



Make the dough: Mix all of the ingredients together in a large bowl, kneading until it forms a smooth, soft dough. Cover and let relax for at least half an hour.

Make the filling:

Combine the ground beef, onion, garlic, olives, oregano, paprika, tomato sauce, and honey in a medium bowl. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, then mix the filling with your hands until well combined before filling hamantaschen.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F, and lightly dust your countertop with flour. Line two rimmed sheet pans with parchment paper or silicone mats.

Fill as directed above. Bake 20 minutes or until filling is cooked.




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